‘Queer Eye’ Star Karamo Brown Reveals He Attempted Suicide 12 Years Ago

Queer Eye star Karamo Brown is speaking up about his own suicide attempt to help fans who might be dealing with similar mental health issues.

“Hey friends, so I decided to do a quick little video about the fact that I shared that today in 2006, I did attempt to commit suicide,” he began in a video posted to his Instagram Thursday.

“You know, I was in a very dark place. I just felt like life could not get any better, everything that was happening to me was never going to change, and I tried to take my own life. And if it wasn’t for my best friends Raymond and Tre calling the ambulance, getting me off the couch, I probably would not be here today.”

He then went on to explain why helping people through their experiences with mental health issues takes up so much of his work.

“I want you all to know that, as you see me on Queer Eye helping people with their mental health, and you see me on my social media helping people, it’s because it’s important to me,” he continued. “Not just because I’m trained in this field, but because I know so many of us suffer from mental health issues and we just don’t know where to turn, and every day seems darker and darker.” (Brown revealed in a Nylon interview from June that he worked as a social worker and psychotherapist for almost 12 years before shifting gears to television.)

He wrapped up the video with more words of support and implored his followers to be proactive in helping out friends who might be struggling. “I want you to know that things do get better. If you get help and you do the work daily, your life can change. I’m living proof of that,” he said. “And if you know someone in your life who is going through it, reach out to them. You could be their support.”

In the caption, Brown explained that he was inspired to do the video by everyone’s “kind words” over his decision to share about his suicide attempt in an earlier Instagram post. He also included shout-outs to his friends Raymond and Tre, as well as the Trevor Project, the crisis intervention and suicide prevention organization for LGBTQ youth.

“As a mental health professional I believe We all need to make our Mental Health a priority,” he wrote. “[Whether] you’re sad, depressed or suicidal like I was… you can make it through. There is a better day around the corner with support. Big thank you to @rayauxais & @treatomic I love you both more thank you’ll ever know. If you need help call 1-800-273-8255.”

If you or someone you know is going through a crisis, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741-741.

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