10 Core Exercises for Lower Back Pain Relief

Lower back pain is a pesky problem that unfortunately, many of us have experienced at one point or another to some degree.

“Lower back pain is the most common musculoskeletal ailment in the U.S., and can often be mitigated by strengthening the core musculature,” Blake Dircksen, D.P.T., C.S.C.S., a physical therapist at Bespoke Treatments New York, tells SELF. “The ‘core’ is a cylinder of abdominal and back muscles that wraps around the body like a corset,” Dircksen explains. (The glutes are also considered a part of the core, since they connect to the pelvis and ultimately the back and abdominal muscles.) As with any muscles, by strengthening them, you will increase the amount of weight your lower back can comfortably move, which means it will be better equipped to handle the same stress from your workouts and everyday life without getting as achey.

“Without a strong core, your body will rely more on your passive structures, such as your ligaments and bones, which places more stress on discs and therefore increases your likelihood of injury,” adds Melanie Strassberg, P.T., D.P.T., clinical director of Professional Physical Therapy in New Rochelle, New York.

In addition to strengthening the core muscles, it’s also important to address any mobility problems, says Jacque Crockford, M.S., C.S.C.S., exercise physiology content manager at American Council on Exercise, which can sometimes be what’s causing pain. If specific movements like twisting or bending or extending your spine feel uncomfortable, there may be mobility (flexibility) issues at play. Doing some gentle stretching (like these yoga poses) might help. (If it gets worse with those stretches, stop and see a doctor.)

When you’re working to strengthen the core, you’ll want to focus on exercises that don’t exacerbate lower back issues. “It’s important to find out which movements (flexion, extension, rotation) cause pain or discomfort and to avoid those movements, while continuing to work into ranges that are not provoking,” Dircksen says. Crockford suggests focusing on exercises that keep the core stable and avoiding twisting movements to avoid exacerbating pain.

As with any sort of pain, it’s crucial to figure out the source so you can properly treat it. Sharp or stabbing pain that extends beyond your low back or is accompanied by symptoms like abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, could be signs of various other conditions and definitely warrant a trip to the doctor. If you have a history of lower back injuries or disc problems, always see your doctor before trying any new exercise.

But if your lower back pain is more of a general achiness or discomfort, the experts here with suggest adding some core exercises into your routine to strengthen the entire area and better support your back.

Demoing the moves is Zach Job, a New-York based artist and producer and up-and-coming drag queen whose dream of joining a circus has prompted him to train in everything from gymnastics to boxing to acro-yoga. He also likes working out with kettlebells, rock climbing, biking, and playing dodgeball.